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Articles Tagged with child visitation

Co-Parentind_AdobeStock_267042826-300x200For many divorced couples, a co-parenting agreement seemed like the perfect solution for raising their children under imperfect conditions. But then came COVID-19 and all of its related restrictions, which changed the co-parenting landscape especially for families where at least one parent is considered an essential worker. Even now as we begin to emerge from the constraints relating to this virus, we’re being encouraged to exercise caution and maintain our social distance whenever possible. This leaves divorced parents facing a lot of questions.

Technically, custody and child visitation agreements entered into prior to the recent pandemic are still valid. But what do parents do when they don’t feel comfortable with the precautions their ex-spouses are – or aren’t – taking? Today more than ever successful co-parenting requires a greater effort in cooperation. For some guidelines on how to manage your co-parenting arrangements during these unprecedented times, read “Better Safe Than Sorry: Co-Parenting in the Age of Social Distancing.”

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If you filed for divorce immediately prior to or during this time of COVID-19, chances are good that your case is experiencing delays. The restrictions imposed to help stop the spread of this virus have caused the closure of a number of businesses, government agencies and many courts to all but emergency cases. Not only may these restrictions be causing a delay in the final judgement on your divorce, but they are impacting a number of related issues including financial settlements, spousal and child support requests and child custody matters.

The impact COVID-19 is having on divorces and related issues is discussed in more detail in the Forbes article, “6 Ways The Coronavirus Can Infect Your Divorce – And Simple Steps To Protect Yourself.”

co-parenting-challenges-400-08017030d-300x200One of the difficult end-products of divorce is learning to navigate the unique challenges of co-parenting. Coordinating schedules and synchronizing parenting styles with your ex while dealing with your own mixed emotions and lifestyle adjustments is hard but necessary for the sake of the children.

The good news is you’re not alone; many parents before you have gone through the same situations and faced the same challenges – and you can learn from them. “8 Tips for Better Co-Parenting After Divorce” offers real-life advice from two moms who have been there.

children-holidays-400-07103763d-300x255Celebrating the holidays after divorce can be an extremely stressful situation. During this season, we put a lot of emotional value on family traditions, which are often passed down from generation to generation. These traditions are what make our holiday celebrations uniquely special, but they are also what makes facing the holidays after divorce so difficult for adults and children.

Divorced couples who plan to co-parent their children need to create new traditions to accommodate their new family structure. To do this effectively requires compromise and open-mindedness. For tips on how to avoid conflict and miscommunication and keep the holiday excitement alive for your children, read “Coordinating Child Custody During Holidays.”

kids-of-divorce-400-04210196d-300x200As you go through a divorce, your attention understandably can be centered on your own problems and emotions. You’re hurt, angry, sad and uncertain of what the future holds. On top of that, you’re determined not to let your soon-to-be ex get the best of you in the divorce settlement. In the midst of all this, it is sometimes difficult to give sufficient attention to what your children really need from you at the moment.

Often, a parent’s first reaction while in the divorce process is to assure their children that the divorce is not about them and it is not their fault; it’s a situation between the adults. But divorce affects everyone in the family and placating your children just won’t work. In an article entitled “Divorce is never easy – but here’s what your kids need from you,” Dr. Kevin Leman explains what your children really need and how you can help them navigate this highly emotional time in their lives.

Attorney and Family and Divorce Mediator, Rosalyn A. Metzger, concludes her three-part article on the Mediation process with a discussion on how child-related issues can benefit from the process. To read the first two articles, see “The ABC’s of Mediation – Part I: The Process” and “The ABC’s of Mediation – Part II: Financial Issues.”

Mediating Parenting Time and Related Issues

Mediation of Child Issues - photo of young boy dressed in jeans and striped shirt holding hands with mother and father is following behindOne hot-button issue in divorce is often the children. Some people get stuck on “50-50” parenting time. However, you are well advised to consider all of the circumstances when trying to sort out the best parenting plan for your family. While New Jersey links child support to the amount of time the children share with each parent, in mediation you can separate those two issues so that money is not the guiding factor.

visitation-400-04555027d-201x300It is generally believed children benefit from healthy relationships with both of their parents. That’s why in divorces, parents often are awarded joint custody. In this way, they continue to share in the decisions and responsibilities of raising their children, as well as in the physical custody of those children. Sometimes, however, courts will not award joint custody but instead will grant visitation rights to the non-custodial parent. That is unless that parent is deemed unfit and the courts believe such visits would not be in the child’s best interests.

If your divorce involves child visitation, you will want to avoid making mistakes that can lead to conflicts between you and your ex. One of the most important things to look for is that your final divorce decree contains the specific terms of the visitation agreement. To learn more about child visitation agreements and what to watch for, read “Child Visitation: It’s a Post-Divorce Fact of Life.”

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