Articles Tagged with post-divorce issues

Post-Divorce-Checklist-FL-blog-300x200For most couples, the divorce process starts the moment they realize their marriage is beyond repair, long before they get attorneys involved and start the legal process. It can be months, and in some cases years, between the time a couple decides to dissolve their marriage and the time the divorce is finalized by the court. So, it’s no wonder that once they do have their divorce decree in hand, they want nothing more than to sit back and heave a sigh of relief. But there’s still work to be done.

Once a divorce is finalized, there are loose ends to tie up, some of which are time sensitive. To make sure you don’t miss important deadlines or forget to update important documents, it’s a good idea to create a post-divorce to-do list. For help on what such a list should include, read “Post-Divorce Checklist: Exactly What You Must Do After Divorce.”

Co-Parentind_AdobeStock_267042826-300x200For many divorced couples, a co-parenting agreement seemed like the perfect solution for raising their children under imperfect conditions. But then came COVID-19 and all of its related restrictions, which changed the co-parenting landscape especially for families where at least one parent is considered an essential worker. Even now as we begin to emerge from the constraints relating to this virus, we’re being encouraged to exercise caution and maintain our social distance whenever possible. This leaves divorced parents facing a lot of questions.

Technically, custody and child visitation agreements entered into prior to the recent pandemic are still valid. But what do parents do when they don’t feel comfortable with the precautions their ex-spouses are – or aren’t – taking? Today more than ever successful co-parenting requires a greater effort in cooperation. For some guidelines on how to manage your co-parenting arrangements during these unprecedented times, read “Better Safe Than Sorry: Co-Parenting in the Age of Social Distancing.”

relocation-400-07509883d-300x150A recent decision by the New Jersey Supreme Court has changed the way divorce courts now decide cases involving the relocation of children.

When considering divorce matters dealing with the custody of children, courts apply the “in the child’s best interest” standard.  One exception to that has been the issue of moving children out of state against the other parent’s wishes. In those cases, the courts instead considered whether or not such a move would “cause harm” to the child. Until now, that is.

To learn how a recent ruling has changed the courts’ approach to this relocation issue read, “Court changes rules for divorced parent who want to leave N.J. with child.”

gray-divorce-400-05339652d-300x201Gray divorce — the term given to couples age 50 and older who terminate their marriages — seems to be a growing trend.

The National Center for Health Statistics reported that in 2015 there were 10 divorced people for every 1,000 married people age 50 and older in the U.S., compared with 5 divorced people for every 1,000 married people in that age group in 1990. In the 65+ age group, the 2015 divorce rate was 6 for every 1,000 married persons, which was 3 times the 1990 rate. See “A costly ‘gray divorce’ can upend your retirement plans.”

While couples at this stage of life may not have to worry about such issues as child custody and support, divorce still takes an emotional toll and can endanger the couple’s retirement funds. If these funds are not properly divided and transferred, the couple risks tax consequences and possible penalties that can be devastating to their financial well-being. To learn about important steps to take to protect your retirement funds in the event of a gray divorce, read “5 Retirement Moves for Recently Divorced Couples.”

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