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Articles Tagged with divorce proceedings

Understand-Child-Support-FL-blog-300x200When parents are seeking a divorce, some of the biggest issues they will need to resolve involve their children, specifically custody arrangements and child support.

On the most basic level, child support is intended to cover the essential, daily needs of the children: food, clothing, and shelter. But support payments can also extend to cover additional expenses, including those related to education, healthcare, employment-related childcare, and extra-curricular activities. These additional expenses can often be a source of conflict between divorcing parties. If the parents cannot come to an agreement on how to divide these expenses, the court will intervene.

To prepare yourself to negotiate an equitable child support agreement or to better understand the court’s ruling, read “The Ultimate Guide to Child Support.”

Rushing-Divorce-FL-Blog-300x200For most couples, divorce isn’t a decision arrived at overnight. Usually, the decision to divorce comes after long periods of living with irreconcilable differences and numerous attempts to resolve conflicts. It is understandable then why, once the decision to divorce is finally reached, couples just want it to be over with so they can get on with their lives. Rushing through the divorce process, however, can be a bad idea.

No matter the reasons behind a couple’s decision, divorce can be a very emotional process. Those emotions can hamper a couple’s ability to make good, sound decisions. Agreeing to something for the sake of getting the divorce over with can negatively impact life post-divorce. To learn more about why rushing through a divorce is never a good idea, read “How Long Will My Divorce Take?

Settlement_Agreement_AdobeStock_236389547-300x200When negotiating your divorce settlement, it is important to carefully review every detail. Once a settlement agreement is reviewed and signed by both parties, the divorce is considered finalized. What happens then if it is discovered that something has been left out of the agreement? What recourse, if any, do you have?

The answer depends, in part, on whether the oversight is discovered by both spouses who then agree on the distribution of the assets involved, or if only one spouse realizes that an oversight has been made and seeks to amend it. To learn more, read “Steps to Take When an Issue in a Divorce Settlement Is Overlooked.”

before_hiring_divorce_attorney_AdobeStock_121654723-300x200The past year brought unprecedented challenges that caused many of us to reassess various aspects of our lives – our jobs, our lifestyles, our relationships. For many couples, the challenges proved too much, leading them to contemplate divorce.

Terminating a relationship is a big step not to be entered into rashly. Before you hire a lawyer and sign your divorce papers, there are several things you should do to make sure the decision to divorce is right for you and your family. And, if it is, these steps can help ease your transition to your post-divorce life. To learn more, read “Decided to Divorce? Here’s Where to Start.”

credit-card-debt-400-04377239d-300x200Marriage is a partnership, therefore, it is not unusual for couples to share both assets and liabilities while they are together, but what happens in a divorce? Usually spouses, with the help of their lawyers, will work to reach agreements for the distribution of property and other assets. The court may intervene if amicable agreements can’t be reached. However, the distribution of debt, particularly credit card debt, is a different story.

Depending on the specific circumstances of a divorce, the court may make determinations on the repayment of debt. For instance, the court may rule one spouse is solely liable for the debt repayment, or it can rule on the percentage of liability each spouse holds for the satisfaction of their debt. That ruling, however, does not negate the original terms of the credit agreement. Because credit cards represent a contractual agreement between card issuer and cardholder (i.e., the person in whose name the card was issued), credit card companies hold the cardholder ultimately responsible for any and all payments due on the card. That holds true even if the charges were made by someone else, such as an authorized card user. If a court rules someone other than the cardholder is responsible for debt repayment, it is up to the cardholder to see that ruling is enforced.

To learn more about divorce and credit card obligations and the recourse you may have, read “This is how credit card debt gets split up in a divorce.”

atty-meeting-prep-400-04880101d-201x300For many people, the decision to divorce comes after months or even years of assessing their situation and giving careful consideration to all other options. But, no matter how long you have lived with the possibility of divorce, taking that first step to end your marriage is very emotional. Emotions can easily cloud your judgment and prevent you from thinking clearly so, before you meet with your divorce attorney for the very first time, it pays to be prepared.

In order for a divorce attorney to successfully defend your rights in a divorce, he or she must be aware of the facts relating to your situation and have a clear understanding of the marital assets and debts involved. Providing your attorney access to this information from the start can help you avoid delays in your divorce proceedings. For an idea of what kind of documentation would be helpful, read “What To Bring To Your First Appointment.”

 

divorce-health-insurance-400-04163321d-300x200It is common in a marriage for one spouse to opt for family coverage under their employer’s health insurance benefits. This way, the employee’s medical expenses as well as those of their partner and children are covered. But divorce changes that – health insurance policies don’t extend to ex-spouses. There’s no need to panic, just understand your options and plan accordingly.

Under most circumstances, family coverage remains in effect as long as a couple is married, even if they choose to live separately pending finalization of their divorce. Of course your spouse does have the option to switch to an individual or an individual with children plan, but usually such changes are allowed only during open enrollment periods. If you are covered under your spouse’s medical insurance, make it a point to be aware of the open enrollment dates for that plan and use the interim time to investigate all your options to find the coverage best suited to your health and your finances.

To get an idea of what alternative coverage is available to you read the Forbes.com article, “What You Need To Know About 3 Key Options For Health Insurance After Divorce.”

detox-divorce-400-04055398d-223x300For most couples, the decision to divorce comes only after all attempts to save their marriage have failed. Once it becomes clear that divorce is their only solution, they just want the relationship to end so they can begin the process of moving on with their new lives. Only the most narcissistic among us want the process to drag on.

A drawn-out divorce can be costly and emotionally draining. There are legal strategies you can employ to protect yourself – and your children – from additional pain. Read “Detox Your Divorce With These 5 Smart Legal Moves” to learn how you can keep your divorce process civil and as brief as possible.

copiing-400-07316868d-300x200Divorce can be complicated and all-consuming. The one thing no parent wants to do, however, is to lose sight of their children’s wellbeing during the process. As your emotions run the gamut between hurt and anger, it’s important to remember that your children, too, are affected by this change in your family dynamics.

One of the worse things you can do is to hide the truth from your children. Telling your children that you or your spouse is “going away for a little while” won’t soften the blow; it will only give them false hope. What they need most at this time is the support of both parents. For pointers on how to help your children deal with your divorce, read lifehack.org’s article by Dr. Magdalena Battles entitled, “How to Raise Healthy, Happy Kids After Going Through a Divorce.”

Crying woman staring at diamond ring as she contemplates divorceMost people don’t enter into divorce lightly. In fact, it’s usually the last resort couples turn to when all other attempts to revive their dying marriage have failed. It’s no wonder then that people facing divorce run the gamut of emotions – sadness, anger, fear, disappointment. The last thing anyone in that situation needs is surprise.

Before taking that first step to filing for divorce, it is important to understand the process. Emotions have a way of clouding our judgment. Knowing what to expect in the divorce process can help couples make rational, rather than emotional, decisions that can better prepare them for their new lives; it can even help them decide if divorce really is the right answer to their marital problems. To learn more about the divorce process, read “Time To Divorce: Do You Know What To Expect During The Divorce Process?

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