Articles Tagged with divorce negotiations

kids-and-divorce-400-07341790d-300x200Divorce is an emotional, complex process and it can be painful for everyone involved – especially the children. While parents are busy hashing out the terms of their divorce, including finances, asset distribution and custody arrangements, the children are left to deal with a lot of uncertainties as they watch their lives spin out of control.

The husband/wife relationship may be ending, but the parent/child relationship remains intact – and no parent likes to see his or her child suffer. It’s important for both parents to take the time to make the divorce process less traumatic for their children. The article, “33 Important Ways to Prepare Your Child for Divorce,” offers some practical advice for doing this.

atty-meeting-prep-400-04880101d-201x300For many people, the decision to divorce comes after months or even years of assessing their situation and giving careful consideration to all other options. But, no matter how long you have lived with the possibility of divorce, taking that first step to end your marriage is very emotional. Emotions can easily cloud your judgment and prevent you from thinking clearly so, before you meet with your divorce attorney for the very first time, it pays to be prepared.

In order for a divorce attorney to successfully defend your rights in a divorce, he or she must be aware of the facts relating to your situation and have a clear understanding of the marital assets and debts involved. Providing your attorney access to this information from the start can help you avoid delays in your divorce proceedings. For an idea of what kind of documentation would be helpful, read “What To Bring To Your First Appointment.”

 

Photo of pen lying on top of mortgage application illustrating need to refinance after divorceNegotiations have ended, your divorce is final and your ex gets the house. It’s over . . . or is it?

Couples often make the mistake of assuming that if the marital home is awarded to one spouse in the divorce negotiations, the other spouse no longer has any obligations regarding mortgage payments. That’s not quite true. Removing a name from the title and the mortgage are two different things. And as long as both names remain on the mortgage, both spouses are responsible for meeting the obligation. Rarely can one person simply assume a joint mortgage. The best solution would be to refinance the mortgage in one spouse’s name.

There are several other reasons refinancing your home after divorce could be beneficial. To learn more, read “Til The House Do Us Part: The Top Five Reasons To Refinance After Divorce.”